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20121201
20121231
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CNBC 4
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CNBC
Dec 26, 2012 9:00am EST
. on to the fiscal cliff this morning. the president cutting his vacation short in hawaii. the president plans to leave for washington tonight. congress expected to return on thursday. president, guys, not expected to actually arrive in washington until tomorrow morning. no talks scheduled that we know of as of yet. all the attention's going to turn to the senate, which tends to be more of a compromising body than the house is. >> yes. and the president is available in person if you should want to go over there and visit with him. or perhaps if he wants to visit with anybody else. the consensus seems to be if you get some sort of a deal, it's obviously not going to be the big deal. it will simply be something that extends the tax cuts for the vast majority of americans, at least those earning less than $250,000 a year. the consensus seems to be, carl, that if we don't get a deal by the second or third or fourth week, the super bowl week, we'll start to feel it in the economy. >> we had a notable sell-off. there is typically a bias on christmas eve, but the worst christmas eve performance for t
CNBC
Dec 27, 2012 3:00pm EST
ourselves in, and the last night president obama called myself and the speaker and maybe others from hawaii and asked if there was something we could do to avoid the fiscal cliff. i would say we're frustrated because we've been asking the president and the democrats to work with us on a bipartisan agreement for months. literally for months, a plan that would simplify the tax code and shrink the deficit, protect the taxpayers and grow the economy. democrats consistently rejected those offers. the president chose instead to spend his time on the campaign trail. this was even after he got re-elected and congressional democrats sat on their hands. now republicans have bent over backwards. we stepped way, way out of our comfort zone. we wanted an agreement, but we had no takers. the phone never rang, and so now here we are five days from the new year, and we might finally start talking. democrats have had an entire year to put forward a balanced bipartisan proposal, and if they had something to fit the bill, i'm sure the majority leader would have been able to deliver the votes the president wou
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 1:00pm EST
the most category? taking into account mortgage size and income. borrows in hawaii and washington, d.c. get the greatest benefit. from 3 to 5%. california hard hit, losing that reduction could hurt a lot. talking about hard hit, take a look at arizona, nevada and florida. does that really affect home buying when the bulk of buyers in those states are investors who don't use mortgages? the answer, probably not. now i want it highlight new york and new jersey. they are on the high end of what you get from the tax benefit. and they desperately need buyers. two states have huge foreclosure backlogs. they need brisk buy flg order to eat up that distress. we want to keep that in perspective. people say taking away this deduction will raise home prices and drop purchasing power. but we have to remember that the interest deduction is used by 27% of borrowers. what is interesting is that older americans are getting hit with it more because they usually would move out of their large homes by now and they today stay in place because they weren't able to sell during the housing crash. guys? >> diana, d
CNBC
Dec 10, 2012 9:00am EST
saved on at least $2,000 with this deduction. on the flip side, borrowers in washington, d.c., hawaii and california, they're getting the biggest tax benefit in the $3,000 to $4,000 range. new york and new jersey are also way up there, thanks to high home values and income. and i'm noting them because these two states need home buyers, desperately. they have some of the biggest backlogs of distressed properties and need buyers in there absorbing that distress. taking away the deduction takes away one more reason to buy. $2,000 to $5,000 a year is a big savings. but we have to keep this in perspective. you only get the deduction if you itemize an only about one-third of americans do itemize. just 27% taking the deduction. and i want to note one other thing, older americans, 54% of families ages 55 to 64 are carrying mortgage debt. that's way up from 37% in 1989, because during the housing crash they were unable to move. so that's going to hit them hard as well. especially for the next several years. melissa? >> some very interesting figures. diana, thanks for that report. back at headq
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